(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "C64C Introductory Guide"

COMMODORE 




PERSONAL COMPUTER 

introductory guide 




A quick-start guide to loading and running software 
on the world's best selling personal computer. 



commodore 64C ™ 
introductory guide 



A quick'Start guide to loading and running software on the 
world's best selling personal computer 



getting started 


3 


the 64C keyboard 


15 


using software 


23 


user's manual statement 


33 





getting started 




£V£xt't'ii\n c#-o#*#-**rl 



• yes you can — with the 
Commodore 64C 


2 


• what you need to get started 


4 


• turning on the computer for 
the first time 


5 


• the commodore 64C ports 


6 


• initial screen display 


8 


• screen messages 


9 


• moving around the screen 


10 


• trying out your new 
commodore 64C 


11 


• about ram and rom 


12 


• troubleshooting chart 


13 



yes you can — with the commodore 64C 



The Commodore 64C personal computer is a powerful, sophisticated and easy to use informa- 
tion processing system. With the 64C, you can process almost any kind of information- 
business, personal, educational, recreational, scientific, financial, and more. And with the 64C 
you can present this information in almost any form— words, numhers, pictures and sound. 

With the wide-ranging capabilities of the 64C at your disposal, you can do all this: 



word processing 

• Type a draft 

• Make changes or correct mistakes 
electronically 

• Print out a perfect final copy 

• Create form letters and mailing lists 

• Save all your material in electronic files 

• Recall information with a few keystrokes 

business 

• Set up and maintain spreadsheets 

• Set up and maintain budgets and payrolls 

• Create "what if scenarios 

• Perform complex statistical analysis 

• Electronically calculate personal and 
business tax data 

• Automatically print out complete tax 
forms 

• Control your investment portfolio 

• Create and maintain general ledgers, 
accounts receivable and accounts payable 

• Generate full-color graphs and charts 
based on your numerical data 



data base and file management 

• Create your own electronic files and data 
bases 

• Store and control letters and documents, 
and numerical, statistical and financial 
data 

• Create and maintain inventories 

• Keep track of valuable collections (wines, 
stamps, coins, records, hooks, etc.) 

• Create and update status reports 

• File recipes — even create your own 
cookbook! 

telecommunications 

• Check financial market activities 

• Consult airline schedules 

• Do your banking 

• Shop for and order merchandise 

• Consult information services—like 
Quantum Link™ The Source? 1 Delphi'," 
CompuServe™ Dow Jones™ The New York 
Times'™ — for detailed information on 
almost any topic 



• Electronically "mail" almost any kind of 
information, almost anywhere 

• Consult encyclopedias like the World 
Book and the Academic American 
Encyclopedia electronically 

• Send and receive personal messages and 
other information through thousands of 
computer bulletin hoards 

• Receive newspapers on your TV or 
monitor 

education 

• Earn college credits or just take courses for 
fun with The Electronic University 

• Study math, science, English, music, Ian- 
guages and other subjects, at both elemen- 
tary and advanced levels 

• Use light pens, drawing tablets and speech 
synthesizers 

• Visit the stars through your own 
planetarium 

• Learn how ro program in languages 
such as BASIC, C, COBOL, COMAL, 
FORTH, FORTRAN, LOGO, PASCAL, 
PILOT— and even assembly and machine 
language 

• Control the pace of learning— go as fast or 
as slow as you like 

entertainment 

• Play hundreds of action games and mind 
games 



• Create and print out designs and pictures 
in 16 vibrant colors 

• Create and play music with the 64C's 
versatile 3-voice, 6-octave sound 
synthesizer 

• Do all this in the comfort of your home— 
you never have to wait in line or pay to 
park the car 

interfacing with other equipment 

• Connect your 64C to printers, disk drives, 
tape recorders, communications modems, 
video monitors, television sets, stereo 
equipment, video recorders, joysticks, 
paddle controllers, telephones, light pens, 
drawing tablets, numeric keypads, music 
synthesizers, scientific equipment . . . 

• Control your household appliances 

• Even control your own robot servant! 

IN DOING ALL THESE THINGS, 
YOU CAN USE THE 64C IN TWO 
WAYS: 

• You can select from many prepackaged 
programs (software) available on cartridge, 
disk or tape. 

• Or you can create and run your own 
programs. 

Whatever your level of expertise, you will find 
that with the information in this booklet you 
can begin using your 64C quickly and easily. 



what you need to get started 



Here's what you need to start computing 
with your Commodore 64C; 

• The computer keyboard, which 

lets you type information and send it 
to the computer 

• A television set or a video 

monitor, which lets you sec what the 
computer is doing 

You can connect accessory equipment 
(sometimes called peripheral equipment 
or simply peripherals) to your 64C. For 
example, with a disk drive or cassette 
recorder, you can save your work. With a 
printer, you can make a copy of your 
work. 




If you haven't already con- 
nected your equipment, 
follow the directions given 
in the QUICK-CONNECT 
GUIDE, which is packed in 
the computer box. 



turning on the computer for the first time 



— if you are using a television set 

1. MAKE SURE THAT YOU 
HAVE CONNECTED THE COM- 
PUTER PROPERLY TO THE 
TELEVISION SET. 

Follow the instructions in the QUICK- 
CONNECT GUIDE. 




2. SET THE CHANNEL SELEC- 
TOR SWITCH ON THE BACK OF 
THE COMPUTER. 

Set the switch (marked L-H ) to either 
channel 3 or channel 4— whichever is not 
used in your area. 

3. TURN ON THE TV SET 

4. TURN ON THE COMPUTER 

The red POWER light on the top left side 
of the computer then comes on and the 
initial screen display appears. 



— if you are using a monitor: 

1. MAKE SURE THAT YOU 
HAVE CONNECTED THE COM- 
PUTER PROPERLY TO THE 
MONITOR. 

Follow the instructions in the QUICK 
CONNECT GUIDE. 

2. TURN ON THE MONITOR. 

3. TURN ON THE COMPUTER. 

The small red POWER light on the top 
left side of the computer then comes on 
and the initial screen display appears. 





ITU 
l't.Tl!i 

23 



the commodore 64C ports 













CONTROL 



PORTS 

For joysticks, mouse, etc. 



POWER 
PORT 




EXPANSION 
PORT 




L/H 

TV Channel Selector 
(3 or 4) 



.... 




T T f T f f f 1 ] \ \ 







VIDEO 

PORT 



SERIAL 
PORT 




CASSETTE 
PORT 



USER 
PORT 



initial screen display 



Shortly after you turn on your computer, you should see a display like the one 
shown below on your television set or monitor: 



— the cursor 

Notice the small flashing rectangle at the upper left part of the screen, just below 
the word READY. This rectangle is called the cursor. The cursor marks your posi- 
tion on the screen. When you type in something or when the computer responds to 
something you have typed in, the cursor moves accordingly. 



— the cursor 



— adjusting the screen display 

If the screen display is not clear, adjust 
the controls on your television set or 
monitor. If you don't get a picture at 
all, use the troubleshooting chart in the 
QUICK- CONNECT GUIDE to check 
your connections. 




screen messages 



If you press the RETURN without having entered something that the computer can 
understand, you may see a message on the screen from the computer (e.g., SYN- 
TAX ERROR). These messages are the computer's way of telling you that it can't 
act on the information you have entered. In some cases the messages arc self- 
explanatory, but in some cases you may need an explanation of the message. 
Appendix A of the Commodore 64C System Guide lists and explains the error 
messages for the 64C. 




moving around the screen 



You can move around the screen hy moving the cursor, To do this, you use the two 
keys marked with arrows, located at the right end of the bottom row of the main 
keyboard. 

! Press SHIFT CRSR lo mow 

i iIk- i urv>r »|i 

t 




'.: 







_ 

Pru SI HIT CRSR i„ m^ 1 

the cursor IcfT 1 

I 



fan CRSR to move tin 



You don't have to keep tapping a 
CRSR key to get it to move more than 
one space. Just hold the key down and 
the cursor will continue to move until it 
reaches the position you want it to be 
in. Remember that you also must hold 
down the SHIFT key at the same time 
if you are moving up or to the left. 



[ I 1 ' 1 ' l USR Co mow 

I tlw lUfvH dOWO 



Here's how the cursor keys work: 




Press CRSR to move the 
cursor down 



smrr 



r 



CRSR I 



Press SHIFT CRSR to move 
the cursor up 




SUNT 



r 




Press CRSR to move the 
cursor right 



Press SHIFT CRSR to move 
the cursor left 



10 



trying out your new commodore 64C 



Here's a simple program to show you that you can get your 64C to do things with- 
out knowing all about programming or BASIC or machine language. 

First, hold down the SHIFT key and press the CLR HOME key. This "clears" (that 
is, erases) the screen. Then type the following lines exactly as they appear. Press the 
RETURN key after each line. 




The numbers at the beginning of each line tell the computer that you are entering a 
program. Pressing the RETURN key after you type each line tells the computer to 
"save" that line (that is, to keep the line in the computer's memory). 

After you have finished typing line 30 and have pressed RETURN for that line, use 
the SHIFT and CLR HOME keys to clear the screen again. Then type RUN and 
press RETURN, and follow the computer's instructions. If you get any kind of error 
message on the screen, you have probably made a typing mistake. Just clear the 
screen (use SHIFT/CLR HOME) and start again. 

There are many prepackaged software programs that you can use with not much 
more experience than it takes to use this little sample program. Once you "load" 
such a program ("loading" means putting the program in the computer's memory), 
the program instructs or 'prompts" you about what to do. The section in this 
booklet called using Software tells you how to "load" and "run" prepackaged 
software programs. 

If you are interested in learning how to create and run your own programs using 
the 64C and the BASIC programming language, see the COMMODORE 64C SYS- 
TEM GUIDE— Learning to Program in Basic 2.0— the other book that comes packed 
with the 64C computer. 



il 



about ram and rom 



You have probably read or heard the terms RAM (Random Access Memory) and 
ROM (Read Only Memory) used in connection with computers. These terms refer 
to the two types of memory used by a computer in processing information. 

RAM is memory that you can use AND change. For example, you can use RAM 
to enter a program, and you can change that program while it is in RAM. The 
64C can hold about 64,000 characters (bytes) of information in its RAM. This 
memory can be directly used by you, and it can be changed by you. 

ROM is memory that can only be used by the computer itself to perform and con- 
trol its internal activities. ROM cannot be changed by you, although there are 
methods that you an use to see what values are in ROM. Your 64C also has 20K of 
standard ROM (Read Only Memory). 

The computer keeps track of how much RAM you have used and how much you 
have left. The computer also keeps track of the contents and status of ROM. So, 
unless you are interested in creating your own programs, you generally need not be 
concerned about RAM and ROM. 



12 



troubleshooting chart 



Symptom 



Remedy 



Indicator light not 'ON' 



No picture (Monitor) 



No picture (TV) 



( im purer not turned ON 

Power supply not plugged into computer 

Power supply not plugged into external power 

Had fuse 

Monitor not connected and/or not turned on 

Incorrect hookup 

PV not connected andA>r turned on 

[ !able to TV not plugged in 

t Computer and/or TV set for wrong channel 



Random pattern cm screen with cartridge in plnee Cartridge not properly msertcd 

Picture with poor or no color 



Poorly tuned color controls 



Sound with excess ba< kuround noise 



Volume too high 



Picture OK, but no sound 



Sou ml OK, hut no picture 



t Computer "locked" (< ursor noi flashing) 



Volume too low 

Audio input (H mouiior aiulm '\ idco cable nor 
i onnct ted 

U using external ampIificTt connections or settings 
noi corret t 

See "No picture" listings above 

( i imputer inadvertently rc< eived instructions to 
disable keyboard; or i he printer, i assel te or disk drii 
is in listening mode 



Computer displays garbled symbols on the screen Overheating 



Make sure power switch is in ON position 

Check power socket for loose or disconnected power 
cable 

C 'he* It connection with wall outlet 

Replace fuse 

Check monitor connections and/or 

ON OFFswitch 



Chci k * omputer hookup to VI IP antenna terminal; 
Check TV powcf conneci ion and ON/OFF switch 
C "hri k nut put cable connection to rV 
Set computer to same channel as TV (3 or 4) 

Turn power OFF and reinsert cartridge 
Adjust color controls on TV or monitor 
Adjust volume 
Adjust volume 

C Connect audio cable to monitor audio input 



( on nee t sound jack to Al ^X input on amplifier and 
seta i AUX input 

See "No picture" listings above 

While depressing I he Kl "N STOP key 

press RESTORE key twice; or reset the peripherals by 

turning off and on; or turn the computer off and on 

Pull plug on power supply and allow to cool down 
(make sure air flow around power supply is not 
restricted) 



NOTE* StatM i lei tricity generated by walking on rugs or carpeting can damage t omputer equipment. If such 
conditions exist, be sure to disc harge the static electricity by touching a metal objc< i before touching the computer ur 
other equipment. 

Also, power surges can damage computer equipment or cause darn to be lost or garbled. You can avoid this by 
installing an inexpensive surge protection device, available at your local electronics or hardware store. 



13 



the 64C keyboard 



the 64C keyboard 



• what the keyboard is 
used for 


16 


• keyboard modes 


17 


• the commodore 64C 




keyboard layout 


18 



15 



what the keyboard is used for 



The 64C keyboard is basically a standard typewriter keyboard with some extra keys. 
You use the keyboard to tell the computer what you want it to do. You also use the keys 
to reply to any messages or questions the computer displays on the screen. (These mes- 
sages and questions are sometimes called "screen prompts" or simply "prompts".) 

Most of the letter, number and symbol keys on the Commodore 64C's keyboard look 
and work like the corresponding key on a standard typewriter. In addition, many of 
these keys can produce special graphic symbols, which are indicated on the front of the 
keys. There are also a number of special keys that let the Commodore 64C computer do 
much more than a typewriter can do. The keyboard illustration shown locates these 
special keys and tells how you use them. 

For a detailed description of key functions see the COMMODORE 64C SYSTEM 

GUIDE. 

Fee! free to experiment at the keyboard. There is little chance that anything you do 
at the keyboard can cause harm, and you will benefit from the "bands on" 
experience. 




16 



keyboard modes 




upper case/graphic 
mode 



upperilower case 
mode 




The 64C keyboard has two typing 
modes: 

—Upper case/graphic mode 
— Upper/lower case mode 

When you turn on the computer, the 
keyboard is in the upper case/graphic 
mode, which means that everything you 
type is in capital letters. 

To switch back and forth between 
modes, you must press the SHIFT key 
and the G key (the COMMODORE key) 
at die same time. If you switch to the 
upper/lower case mode, the keyboard 
works much like a standard typewriter 
keyboard. What you type normally 
appears in lower case; if you want upper 
case (chat is, capital letters) you can hold 
down the SHIFT key or depress the 
SHIFT LOCK key. 

You do not have to be an accomplished 
typist to use the computer effectively. 
You only need to know the general 
keyboard layout, including the location 
and function of the special keys, as 
shown on the keyboard diagram. 



17 



the commodore 64C keyboard layout 



The 64C keyboard is basically a standard 
typewriter keyboard with some extra 
keys. You use the keyboard to tell the 
computer what you want it to do. You 
afso use the keys to reply to any messages 
or questions the computer displays on the 
screen. (These messages and questions 
are sometimes called "screen prompts" or 
simply "prompts".) 



Most of the letter, number and symbol 
keys on the Commodore 64C's keyboard 
look and work like the corresponding key 
on a standard typewriter. In addition, 
many of these keys can produce special 
graphic symbols, which are indicated on 
the front of the keys. There are also a 
number of special keys that let the Com- 
modore 64 C computer do much more 
than a typewriter can do. The keyboard 
illustration shown locates these special 
keys and tells how you use them. 

For a detailed description of key func- 
tions see the COMMODORE 64C 
System Guide. 



US 



CTRL 

-Used with other keys, 
you do special tasks calle 
control functions. 

-Used with numeric keys 
to 8, lets you select from 
set oi eight colors. 




RUN/STOP 

-Used alone to halt a 
program that ts running. 

-Used with the SHIFT key 
to start a program. 



COMMODORE KEY 

(O) 

-Used with the SHIFT 
key, lets you switch 
between the upper/lower 
case and the upper case/ 
graphic modes 

-Used with numeric keys 1 
to 8, lets you select from a 
different set of eight 
colors. 



SHIFT LOCK 

Locks SHIFT key ill the 
ON position. 



INST PEL 

-Used by itself, moves the 
cursor one space ro the left 
and erases any character 
in that space. 

-Used with the SHIFT 
key, allows vou to insert 
characters in a line. 




THE FUNCTION 
KEYS 

The four large keys on the 
right side of the keyboard 
are called "function" keys. 
These keys are marked fi, 
0, li and 17 on the top 
ind a, M, f6 and EB on 
the bottom. 



SHIFT 

Works like the shift key on 
a regular typewriter: when 
held down, lets you print 
capital letters, or the top 
characters on double 
character keys. Also used 
with certain other keys to 
perform special functions. 



CLR HOME 

-Used by itself, returns 
cursor to the HOME 
position. 

-Used with the SHIFT 
key, erases ("clears") 
everything on the screen 
and returns the cursor to 
the HOME position (the 
upper left corner of the 
screen). 



RETURN 

Pressing the RETURN key 
sends what you type into 
the computer's memory. 
Probably the most used of 
all the keys. 



RESTORE 

Used with the RUN 

STOP key to return the 
computer to its normal 
conditions (also known as 
tile default condition-;). 



PRINTING GRAPHIC CHARACTERS 

To print the graphic symbol on the ri^/ir side of a key, 
hold down the SHIFT key while you press the key 
rhat has the graphic character you want to print. You 
can only print the right side graphic characters when 
you arc in the upper case/graphic mode. 

To print the graphic character on the left side of a 
key, hold down the C 1 key while you press the key 
that has the graphic character you want to print. You 
can print the left side graphic in cither mode. 



19 



using software 



using software 



what software is 22 

software package formats 23 

what's in a software package 24 

how to load and run 

software 25 

additional sources of 

information 29 

key function summary 3 1 

command summary 32 



what software is 



Software is a set of instructions (also called a program) that tells your computer 
just what you want it to do. In other words, software is what lets you do things 
with your computer. 

There are two kinds of software: 

1. Prepackaged Software — 

This is software that is ready for you to use. Prepackaged software is sometimes 
called "canned" software. You don't need to know all ahout "computing" or "pro- 
gramming" to use prepackaged software programs. 

There are many thousands of prepackaged or "canned" software programs available 
to you. Much of this software comes from commercial software companies, hut there 
are also many ready-to-use software programs available in computer magazines or 
from computer user groups. 

2. User-Created Software — 



This is software that you yourself make up. To do this you must use a special lan- 
guage, known as a programming language. The Commodore 64C comes with a 
built-in programming language known as BASIC 2.0; see the SYSTEM GUIDE for 
instructions on programming in BASIC 2.0. There are also many other program- 
ming languages available for the Commodore 64C, including LOGO, PILOT, LISP, 
PASCAL, etc. 



:: 



software package formats 




Software comes in three kinds of packages or formats: 

disk — 

Depending on the type of disk drive you are using, these can be either 5 ] A" or 3 ] /z" 
disks enclosed in a protective envelope. 



cartridge — 

Software cartridges, about the size of a deck of cards, are used for many business 
and educational programs, as well as for games. 



cassette tape — 

Software on tape uses a normal-sized audio tape cassette that contains either stan- 
dard audio tape or computer digital tape. The cassette is used with a special Com- 
modore tape recorder called a Datassette. 



In addition to using prepackaged software programs on disks, cartridges or tapes, 
you can make you own programs and put them on disks or tapes. You usually can- 
not put your own programs on a cartridge. 



23 



what's in a software package 



The main part of a software package 
consists of the computer program, 
which is contained on a disk, cartridge 
or tape. The package usually also 
includes printed instructions that tell 
you such things as what the program 
does, how to load and run it, how to 
enter information, and what the pro- 
gram output looks like. 

The amount of instructions supplied 
with the software package usually 
depends on how many things the pro- 
gram can do, and the kind of things it 
can do. These instructions can he less 
than a page long, or they can take up a 
complete manual. 




21 



how to load and run software 



To use a software package, you must do two things: 

— FIRST, you must place the software program in your Commodore 64C's 
memory. This is called loading the program. In some cases, you load the program 
by using the LOAD command, as explained on pages 26, 27, and 28. In other 
cases, the program is loaded automatically, 

— SECOND, you must tell the computer to carry out the program's instruc- 
tions. This is called running the program. In some cases, you run the program by 
using the RUN command. In other cases, the program not only loads but also 
runs automatically. 

The following pages tell you how to LOAD and RUN disk, cartridge and tape 
software. 



25 



loading and running disk software 



Here is the procedure you follow to 
load prepackaged disk softwares or disk 
software that you have programmed 
yourself: 





1. INSERT THE DISK INTO 
THE DISK DRIVE. 

Make sure the disk is all the way in, 
hut don't force it. 



3. TYPE: 

LOAD "PROGRAM NAME", 8 

Here, the words PROGRAM NAME 
stand for the name of the prepackaged 
software program that you're using. 
Note that you must enclose the pro- 
gram name in quotation marks. The 
number 8 tells the computer that you're 
loading a disk program. 




2. PULL DOWN THE LEVER 

ON THE FRONT OF THE DISK 

DRIVE. 

(Some drives may have a small door or 

shutter instead of a lever). 



4. PRESS THE RETURN KEY. 

The activity light on the disk drive will 
go on, and this message will appear on 



the screen: 

SEARCHING FOR PROGRAM 

NAME 
LOADING 

After a short time the screen will dis- 
play this message: 

READY. 




5. TYPE: 

RUN 

6. PRESS THE RETURN KEY 

In some cases, prepackaged disk soft- 
ware may have its own special way to 
enter the LOAD command. Also, some 
commercial software may have an auto- 
matic RUN command built into the 
program. Check the software instruc- 
tions carefully, especially if you have 
any problems. 



loading cartridge software 




CAUTION-YOU MUST TURN 
OFF YOUR COMMODORE 64C 
COMPUTER BEFORE YOU INSERT 
OR REMOVE CARTRIDGES. IF 
YOU DONT, YOU MAY DAMAGE 
THE CARTRIDGE AND THE 
COMPUTER. 




Follow these steps to load cartridge 
software: 

1. TURN OFF THE COMPUTER. 

Press the ON/OFF switch on the right 
side of the computer. The screen display 
on your monitor or television set should 
go dark. 

2. INSERT THE CARTRIDGE IN 
THE CARTRIDGE PORT. 

The cartridge port is the first port on the 
right side of the back of the Commodore 
64C. This port accepts a cartridge only 
one way— with the title up. Insert the 
cartridge firmly but do not force it. 

3. TURN ON YOUR COMMO- 
DORE 64C. 

That's all there is to it. Your cartridge will 
load automatically at this point. You do 
not have to use a LOAD command, and 
usually you do not need to use a RUN 
command. To use the program, just fol- 
low the directions given on the screen, or 
in any printed instructions that come 
with the cartridge. 



27 



loading cassette tape software 



Follow these steps to load prepackaged 
cassette tapes: 




1. PLUG THE DATASSETTE 
INTO THE CASSETTE PORT. 



3. TYPE: 

LOAD "PROGRAM NAME" HH 
The screen then displays this message: 
PRESS PLAY ON TAPE 
The computer searches for the program. 




2. INSERT THE TAPE CASSETTE. 

Rewind the tape if necessary. 



4. WAIT FOR THIS MESSAGE: 

FOUND PROGRAM NAME 

Here, PROGRAM NAME stands for the 

name of the software package you are 

using. 



PRESS THE G KEY. 

The program is LOADED into the com- 
puter. {If for some reason you decide at 
this point that you want to stop the pro- 
gram from LOADing, just press the 
RUN/STOP key.) 

The program will then either start to run 
by itself, or there will be instructions on 
the screen telling you what to do. For 
instance, some programs will tell you to 
type RUN and press RETURN to start 
program operation. 

NOTE: 

Many prepackaged cassette programs 
may take several minutes to load. You will 
know that loading is complete when you 
see the cursor start to blink again, or 
when instructions telling you how to use 
the program appear on the screen. 



28 



additional sources of information 



For more information on using your 64C computer, see the following books: 

• COMMODORE 64C SYSTEM GUJDE 

• COMMODORE 64 PROGRAMMER'S 
REFERENCE GUIDE 

• INTRODUCTION TO BASJC-PARTS, 
J, 11, AND JIJ 

if you have a question,. ♦ 

The Commodore Customer Support group is available to help if you have a question or 
problem. If you can't find the answer to your question in the Commodore documenta- 
tion, you can call Customer Support at the following number: 

(215)436-4200 

If you have what you think is a hardware problem, be sure to call Customer Support. 
There often is a simple answer to such problems. By calling Customer Support you may 
be able to avoid taking your equipment in for service. 



29 



summary of 64C keyboard functions 



key(s) 



function 







h 




RETURN 


[ 


u 


■> ' 


y 



Place information (e.g., a program line) in 
the computer's memory 




Clea 



ear screen 



CRSR I 



Move cursor down 



r^T-^ 



SHIFT 





Move cursor up 



Move cursor right 





Move cursor Left 




Delete character(s) 





Insert charactcr(s) 



30 



function 



key(s) 



Stop a program 



run 1 

STOP I 



Stop a printout 



I run! 

STOP I 



Switch screen mode 




Lock SHIFT key 




Load and run a program from tape 




Change character color 



/- 



r 




CTRL plus ii numeric key fmni 1 ri> 8 



Change character color 





\Z plus a numeric key from I lo8 



(1 



summary of most-used 64C commands 



Function 



Command Format 



Loading a program from disk 


LOAD "PROGRAM NAME", 8 


Loading a program from tape 


LOAD "PROGRAM NAME" 


Saving a program to a disk 


SAVE "PROGRAM NAME", 8 


Saving a program to tape 


SAVE "PROGRAM NAME" 


Running a program 


RUN 


Formatting a disk OPEN 15,8,15:PIUNT#15 1 "N:DISKNAME,ID":CLOSE15 


Displaying the lines of a program 


LIST 


Loading a directory of files on a disk into 
the computer s memory 


LOAD"$" ( 8 


Displaying a disk directory that has been 
loaded into the computer's memory 


LIST 


Clearing the computer's memory 


NEW 



NOTE: For details on any of these commands, see the BASIC 2.0 ENCYCLOPEDIA 
in Chapter 6 of the Commodore 64C System Guide. 



}2 



user's manual statement 



WARNING: 

This equipment has been certified to comply with the limits for a Class B computing device, pursuant to subpart J of 
Part 15 of the Federal Communications Commission's rules, which are designed to provide reasonable protection 
against radio and television interference in a residential installation. If not installed properly, in strict accordance 
with the manufacturer's instructions, it may cause such interference. If you suspect interference, you can test this 
equipment by turning it off and on. If this equipment does cause interference, correct it by doing any ol the 
lol lowing: 

• Reorient the receiving antenna or AC plug. 

• Change the relative positions of the computer and the receiver, 

• Plug the computer into a different outlet so the computer and receiver are on differ- 
ent circuits. 

CAUTION: Only peripherals with shield-grounded cables (computer input-output 
devices, terminals, printers, etc.), certified to comply with Class B limits, can be 
attached to rhis computer. Operation with non-certified peripherals is likely to result 
in communications interference. 

Your house AC wall receptacle must be a three-pronged type (AC ground). If not, 
contact an electrician to install the proper receptacle. If a multi-connector box is tised 
to connect the computer and peripherals to AC, the ground must be common to all 
units. 

If necessary, consult your Commodore dealer or an experienced radio-television technician for additional sugges- 
tions. You may find the following FCC booklet helpful: "How to Identify and Resolve Radio-TV Interference 
Problems." The booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, stock no. 
OO4-OOO-0OM5--L 



First Printing, April 1986 

Copyright © 1986 by Commodore Electronics Limited 

All rights reserved 

This manual contains copyrighted and proprietary information. No part of this publication may be reproduced, 
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, 
recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Commodore Electronics Limited. 

Commodore 64C is a trademark of Commodore Electronics Limited, 

Commodore and Commodore 64 are registered trademarks of Commodore Electronics Limited. 

Commodore BASIC 7.0 



Copyright © 1986 by Commodore Electronics Limited 
All rights reserved 

Copyright © 1977 by Microsoft Corp. 
All rights reserved 



33 



COMMODORE^ 



Commodore Business Machines, Inc. 
1200 Wilson Drive • West Chester, PA 19380 

Commodore Business Machines, Ltd. 
319876-01 3470 Pharmacy Avenue • Agineourt, Ontario, M1W3G3 Printed in USA